Commonities and strange bedfellows

Video of talk on commonities and the internet at a ParaLimes conference in Singapore, March 2-4.

 

Here is a video of a talk on the ideas of commonities (communities that govern commons) and its relationship to the origin of the Internet and the World Wide Web which all happened to be baser on a long tradition  in The sociology of science  that all began in Singapore, 1949,  when physicist Derek de Solla Price noted something odd in his bedroom …

Derek de Solla Price 

I gave the talk at a complexity conference and that explains the end of the talk addressing some issues in complexity. Apart from that the talk deals with issues like Samsø, renewable energy, gift-economy, civil society etc.

 

Logo of the Paralimes “Emerging Patterns” conference

The Paralimes conference “Emerging Patterns” is part of the effort of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore to create an interest and activity in complexity studies. The conference in early March featured a dozen speakers, including two Nobel laureates. 

All the talks are available on video here. Outstanding amongst the twelve talks was economist Brian Arthur’s take on the evolution from equation-based science to algorithm-based science.

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  1. Yale Landsberg

    You have a small typo error…

    Here is a video of a talk on the ideas of commonities (communities that govern commons) and its relationship to the origin of the Internet and the World Wide Web which all happened to be base[r] on a long tradition in The sociology of science that all began in Singapore, 1949, when physicist Derek de Solla Price noted something odd in his bedroom …

    Of more importance, sir, your User Illusion is splendid. And it is wonderful to see your work blossoming in so many important ways!

    For what it is worth, some colleagues of mine (one of whom is a Ph.D. candidate who is applying my approach to contributing to the science of consciousness) and I are working individually and collectively on the development of a mathematics which might be worthy of a few minutes of your obviously very limited amount of time.

    Thus, if things such as clearly seeing the small, but huge distinction between 0 and 1/infinity, and the ability to represent degrees of nothing as both fractions and multiples of zero (the way the real numbers other than zero are fractions and multiples of positive and negative one) are intriguing to you in any way, please get back to me whenever you can find a moment or so.

    Warmest regards, good sir! And be well.

    Reply

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